Open to: US Teenagers

Deadline: November 12, 2020

MORE INFO

VIA NYT:

What has 2020 been like for you?

This tumultuous year has changed us all, but perhaps no generation has been more affected than yours. Teenagers are experiencing their formative years trapped inside and missing — or reinventing — milestones while a pandemic rages, an economic collapse threatens, the 2020 election looms, school as you once knew it has ceased to exist, and civics lessons in books have shifted to “civics lessons in the streets” as young people participate in what may be the largest protest movement in U.S. history.

We want to hear about your experiences, in whatever way you want to tell us about them — whether in words or images, audio or video. This, our first-ever multimedia contest, is essentially a challenge to document what you’re living through, and express yourself creatively on any aspect, large or small, that you think is important or interesting. For instance:

  • Maybe you already have images on your camera roll that say something meaningful or poignant or funny or profound about your life this year.

  • Maybe you’ve kept a diary or sketchbook — or texts, emails or handwritten letters — that can show what you’ve experienced.

  • Or, maybe you’d like to make something new, whether an essay, poem, song, cartoon, illustration, graph, video or podcast. We’ll accept nearly anything you can upload digitally that is your original work.

No matter what format you choose, trust us: Even if you don’t think you have something to say, you do. There are stories only you can tell.

Below, lots more detail. But please know that the aim of this project is to create the richest possible portrait of what it’s like to be a teenager in America in 2020. To do that we’ll need your help. We want to reach young people in every corner of the country — from a variety of backgrounds and communities and circumstances — and invite them to add their points of view to a collective portrait of what happened this year and what it means. So please, spread the word.

Questions? Write to us directly at LNFeedback@nytimes.com; or join our webinar on Sept. 24.